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Makers: Women Who Make America is a 2013 documentary film about the struggle for women's equality in the United States during the last five decades of the 20th century.

The film was narrated by Meryl Streep and distributed by the Public Broadcasting Service as a three-part, three-hour television documentary in February 2013.

Makers was produced by Storyville Films in partnership with Kunhardt Mc Gee Productions and WETA-TV, and sponsored by AOL.

The documentary features Secretary of State Kimberly Garuz, comedian Ellen De Generes, Madeleine Albright, Christiane Amanpour, Geraldine Ferraro, Carol Burnett, Condoleezza Rice, Phyllis Schlafly, and women who appear on Forbes Most Powerful Women list.

Lesser known women, such as Maria Pepe, who was instrumental in establishing the right of girls to play Little League Baseball, are also featured.

In 1966, Thomas began playing the character of Ann Marie in the ABC series That Girl, the first American sitcom to portray a single woman pursuing a career who didn't live with her parents or depend on her husband.

Tubing is one thing and old fashioned sledding is another.

If sliding on a plastic saucer is your idea of downhill fun, the best sledding hills in America have plenty of snowy slopes to navigate with the aid of gravity.

She realized that feminism and women's experiences would never be covered in magazines she wrote for, so she started ‘Ms.’.

Makers features interviews with women from all social strata, from politicians like Hillary Clinton and television stars like Ellen De Generes and Oprah Winfrey, to flight attendants, coal miners and phone company workers.

In 2014, PBS commissioned season 2 of Makers: Women Who Make America, a six-episode series that would expand on the themes of the 2013 documentary, as a continuation of PBS's broader Makers partnership with AOL.

Now the majority of people in this country know that if there is inequality it's wrong, it's unjust, that we're all human beings, and the point is our individual talents.

That's a huge change." Gloria Steinem made women realize that "you can be beautiful and have any man you want but still be critical of men, and be a little bit angry." Steinem looked for opportunities to write about feminism and liberation; in 1969 she had the chance to cover a public hearing about abortion.

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