Dating in morocco

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Many of us who live abroad may realize that it is very hard to integrate into new cultures.

It takes years of interacting with new cultures to understand their values; it only takes one published article to unjustly expect visitors and tourists to Morocco to be expert sociologists. Fact or fiction, it is important to note that many overlooked heart wrenching sentences like this by the author of the article published on MWN: “On any given day, I could walk through the souq in Fez or in the streets of El Jadida and be stared at, called to, and generally harassed.

His family didn't know where he was; Cole's son Adrian told that Moroccan officials "had been reluctant" to even confirm where the senior Cole was, much less incarcerated.

It was as if he had just been plucked off the street and vanished -- which, to a certain degree, he was.

On the “Perks of dating a Moroccan man” Katrina Bushko’s article that enflamed and enraged some to the point of declaring it blasphemous, I’d like to simply state that the unwarranted assault is not only on free speech, but on the very foundation of why Moroccans often feel misunderstood as a culture when they try to respond to stereotypes or misconceptions about their so ‘untouchable’ culture.

Unless weak and otherwise short sighted, there should be a sense of dignified pride in the Moroccan culture with its beauty and its not so glaring realities.

That some Moroccans are driven by an insatiable need to procreate, search for a better future and date foreign blue eyed women is only natural.

This is the backbone of progressive societies where consensus is won by the power of collective visions bargained on behalf of the intellectual health of the community. Can Moroccans learn that disagreement is part of the universe?

Can Moroccans reflect the thinking and openness of a new society?

Tell me why haven’t “readers” with some sense of critical thinking paid attention to such a comment and debated it as a disturbing phenomenon?

It is a huge sociological problem to be a woman in Morocco, because of the relentless harassment on its streets. See, it is easier to blindly defend one’s lack of depth of a host culture, but I find it outrageous to nonchalantly accept the fact that millions of women are frightened to go beyond their walls.

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